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Wikipedia defines economic violence as:

… a type of violence committed by individuals or groups preying on the economically disadvantaged individuals. In some circumstances the individuals may be service workers such as undocumented workers and food service workers, in others they may be spouses, or closeted gays. The World Health Organization defines it as being a form of collective violence, committed by larger groups towards individuals.

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic and its resultant economic crisis there has, thankfully, been many a spotlight shone upon economic violence. Levels of domestic and gender-based violence have escalated while mental health indicators suggest some alarming trends. As national debts balloon, poverty is on the increase across the planet. Supply chains have been interrupted and structural change to resource distribution may be permanent – with potentially both positive and negative outcomes.

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More than ever, organisations need to deliver a customer-focused approach. This is because markets are evolving at a staggering rate and will continue to do so well into the future.

  1. The health pandemic changes working practices and locations
  2. The economic crisis obliges organisations to be more competitive or attentive to their audiences
  3. The squeeze in consumer spending, which will be with us for a long time to come, means priorities are changing. And, they will continue to do so.

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Hubspot provides software products for inbound marketing, sales, and customer service. With regard to the CRM functionality, Hubspot gives details on their website the the core is free, and you have to pay for advanced CRM features. However, we sometimes forget that when we speak about “free”. We’re more often than not speaking in terms of software “freedom” and getting CRM software free of charge! Read more

One of the core features of Corteza is the powerful open-source Low Code platform. To clarify, this means that it’s a rapid development platform that allows you to create responsive business applications that run in the browser, without having to know how to write code. With the following 4 step plan you can make a fully functional record-based app for your business or organisation:

  1. Create a namespace
  2. Add modules
  3. Set up pages
  4. Insert charts

1. Create a namespace

In Corteza Low Code applications are called “namespaces”. You can create a new namespace by entering the “Low Code” tab inside Corteza and click on to the “Create namespace” button. If there are many existing namespace, like on the Corteza Community server, you might need to scroll down first. And then, you simply fill in the “name” field and hit “Save and close”.

Before you continue with step two, you need to enter your freshly created namespace.

List of namespaces (applications) on the Corteza Community Server

2. Create the modules

The second step is to create the modules. Corteza Low Code comes with a simple, yet extensive module builder. These modules could be seen as database tables, but in a non-technical way. This means that each module has a set of fields, which represent data you want to store. While most fields are straightforward (string, number,…), there is one special field with an important role: the record field. This record field allows you to link one module to another, creating a relationship between them.

A clear example is one from Corteza CRM, the powerful open-source CRM build with the Corteza Low Code platform. The “Account” and “Contact” modules are related to each other, because an account in the CRM can have multiple contacts. So, the “Contact” module has a Record type field that links to the “Account” module as in the screenshot below. This allows any contact to be related to a account. And if you want that a contact can be related to multiple accounts, simply check the “multiple” checkbox.

List of modules in Corteza Low Code

 

Fields in a module in Corteza Low Code

3. Set up pages

One you’ve created the modules you need to create the visual layer. These are called “Pages” in Corteza, and there are two types of pages:

  1. Record pages
    A record page shows data related to a single record in a module, which means that every module needs to have one record page.
  2. List pages
    These pages act like dashboards or record lists and show up in the automatically generated top menu.

The simple drag-and-drop page editor is the same for both page types. As a result, you select the type of block you want to show (record data, a list, a calendar, a chart,…), configure it and add it to the page.  After that, you can drag it to any position and resize it as you please.

For more detailed info, check out the extensive Corteza Low Code tutorial on opensource.com.

List of pages in Corteza Low Code

 

Adding a block to a page in Corteza Low Code

4. Insert Charts

Corteza Low Code comes with an advanced open-source chart creation tool. As a result it allows you to create the most used charts in custom business applications, such as line, bar and pie charts. For each chart you define the data source (the module), optional filters, dimensions and metrics, and the chart creation tool manages the rest.

Once you’ve created your charts, you can add them to any page in your own low code business application.

Example of a donut chart, made in Corteza Low Code

 

Example of a dashboard with charts, built with Corteza Low Code

Advanced Low Code features

Corteza Low Code also includes some advanced Low Code features, including access management for different user roles on modules, pages or even single fields, and advanced workflow automation. These two advanced Low Code features will be featured in the coming weeks on this blog.

Try it out yourself!

To summarize, you ony need to follow 4 simple steps to build your own custom business application. In addition, if you want to give it a go, check out the free Corteza Community Server. Log in, open the Low Code app and create your own namespace! Lastly, if you run in to any questions, ping the community for help in the Corteza Community Server messaging tab, or let us know in a comment here.

 

Corteza is actively fashioning itself as the Digital Work Platform for Humanity. That’s a big statement of intent, about as ambitious as it gets – and we’re not going to get there overnight. Our policy of social inclusion rolls out the welcome mat to anyone who can usefully contribute. However, this embrace of diversity must be accompanied by a co-ordinated long-term strategy in order to be effective. Good intentions alone are not sufficient to create real and lasting change.

To help us implement Corteza as the Digital Work Platform for Humanity, we’re in the process of creating a range of programmes, based around the platform, which structure its outreach, broaden its expertise base and inform its future design. The programmes categories are as follows:

  • Humanitarian
  • Ecological
  • Educational
  • Health
  • Public Sector
  • Commercial
  • Digital Economy
  • Localization
  • Accessibility
  • Security
  • Identity and Privacy
  • Compliance

All programmes will be related to at least one other programme, and some programmes will be related to all, creating a programme infrastructure where the activities of any given programme inevitably make the platform as a whole stronger and avoid duplication of work elsewhere. For example, making Corteza Accessible touches on everything we do.

At the moment, we’re crafting an official “purpose” for each programme with the above considerations in mind. These purposes will be voted upon by the Corteza Board of Directors before being formally adopted by the project.

The Corteza project will be free forever to anyone with access to the internet. Our community culture will necessarily be global, emphasizing the interconnectivity and cause-and-effect relationship between everyone, irrespective of their background. Corteza programmes exist to allow us structure our activity so that we drive this global conscience and so that everyone wins. Your positive contributions will be welcomed with open arms and, as my colleague, Mia Arh, states, there’s so much more to a technology project than coding.

Interested in checking out Corteza right now? Head over to https://latest.cortezaproject.org and sign up to the community server that runs on Corteza!